Sounion, the Temples of Poseidon and Athena

The majestic Temples of Poseidon and Athena stand on the rock of Cape Sounion, at the southern tip of the Attica peninsula, their sheer size and beauty causes admiration, whether viewed by sea or land. Used by the Athenians as a place of worship, as well as a fortress guarding the commercial seaways of the Aegean Sea, the Temple of Poseidon could be seen from afar by ships approaching the cape. According to the ancient Greek mythology, King Egeas committed suicide here, leaping to his death after... διαβάστε περισσότερα

Eleusis Archaeological site

One of the most important archaeological sites in Greece, Eleusis graphically displays the vast history of this residential area. Inhabited since the Middle Helladic era, it is renowned for the Eleusinian Mysteries, and Aeschylus, greatest of the tragic poets. As far back in time as ancient Mycenae, the destiny of Eleusis has been linked to Athens. A number of major monuments occupy this site, including: The Sacred Yard, the ancient area of gathering of the believers, and the outmost destination... διαβάστε περισσότερα

The Theatre at Thoricus

To date, the theatre at Thoricus is the oldest known theatre in existence. Located north of Lavrion, almost adjacent to the city, it dates to the end of the Archaic era, between 525 and 480 B.C. But that is not its only distinction. Unlike Greek theatres built in later eras, it is elliptical rather than circular in shape, and has a rectangular, rather than circular orchestra. With 21 rows of seats, the theatre had a seating capacity of 4,000 people. On the east side of the orchestra, sculpted out of the natural... διαβάστε περισσότερα

Kerameikos Archaeological site

Located at the end of Ermou street, the Kerameikos Archaeological site is one of the major archaeological sites in Athens. And though only a small portion of this ancient city quarter is open to the public, this site, home to the "Kerameis" (the potters) of antiquity, is a powerful and moving glimpse into the distant past. Also standing here are the ruins of the Dipylon Gate, the imposing double gates of the Themistocleian city wall, circa 478 B.C. Numerous tombs with “replicated anaglyphs” occupy... διαβάστε περισσότερα